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Visitor cap for Mount Fuji as Japan cracks down on tourist pollution

Japanese authorities are fighting over tourism on Mount Fuji by announcing plans to introduce a toll and visitor cap on the World Heritage site’s most popular hiking trail




More than 221,000 people climbed Mount Fuji in 2023   Credit: Canva

Starting this summer, Japanese authorities will introduce new restrictions on Mount Fuji in a bid to protect the World Heritage site from overtourism.

Standing at 12,388ft (3,776m), in 2023 more than 221,000 people ascended the iconic landmark, added to the Unesco World Heritage List in 2013, with more than 137,000 choosing the popular Yoshida trail.

The new rules see visitor numbers capped with tourists having to pay a fee to use the trail. Alongside its boom in popularity, the site has recorded significant increases in discarded rubbish and general pollution, with the new rules aiming to curb this worrying trend.

According to the Yamanashi prefectural government, it has been deemed necessary to introduce the cap to preserve the natural environment, with the new rules coming into effect starting July 1, 2024.

Limiting visitor numbers to 4,000 per day during the 70-day summer climbing season, not only will the new regulations try to tackle pollution, but also climber safety.

Such is the site’s popularity that many climbers attempt to make the ascent to the top of Mount Fuji, leading to traffic jams, accidents and injuries. Authorities are concerned that inexperienced hikers can often find themselves in difficulty near the summit, where fewer facilities are available.

“We want to ensure the safety of climbers by implementing the (planned) measures,” Yamanashi governor, Kotaro Nagasaki, speaking during a news conference.

As part of the new regulations, climbers will be prohibited from starting their ascent between 4pm and 2am. The funds generated will also go towards the construction of shelters in the event of a volcanic eruption.

The Yoshida trail is the mountain’s most popular ascent thanks to easy access from Tokyo and the number of locations en route offering both accommodation and meals. Last year’s year’s visitor numbers were called “unprecedented” by the government. Under the plans, a gate will be installed at the entrance to the Yoshida trail, where the toll, yet to be announced, will be paid.


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Visitor cap for Mount Fuji as Japan cracks down on tourist pollution | Planet Attractions
news

Visitor cap for Mount Fuji as Japan cracks down on tourist pollution

Japanese authorities are fighting over tourism on Mount Fuji by announcing plans to introduce a toll and visitor cap on the World Heritage site’s most popular hiking trail




More than 221,000 people climbed Mount Fuji in 2023   Credit: Canva

Starting this summer, Japanese authorities will introduce new restrictions on Mount Fuji in a bid to protect the World Heritage site from overtourism.

Standing at 12,388ft (3,776m), in 2023 more than 221,000 people ascended the iconic landmark, added to the Unesco World Heritage List in 2013, with more than 137,000 choosing the popular Yoshida trail.

The new rules see visitor numbers capped with tourists having to pay a fee to use the trail. Alongside its boom in popularity, the site has recorded significant increases in discarded rubbish and general pollution, with the new rules aiming to curb this worrying trend.

According to the Yamanashi prefectural government, it has been deemed necessary to introduce the cap to preserve the natural environment, with the new rules coming into effect starting July 1, 2024.

Limiting visitor numbers to 4,000 per day during the 70-day summer climbing season, not only will the new regulations try to tackle pollution, but also climber safety.

Such is the site’s popularity that many climbers attempt to make the ascent to the top of Mount Fuji, leading to traffic jams, accidents and injuries. Authorities are concerned that inexperienced hikers can often find themselves in difficulty near the summit, where fewer facilities are available.

“We want to ensure the safety of climbers by implementing the (planned) measures,” Yamanashi governor, Kotaro Nagasaki, speaking during a news conference.

As part of the new regulations, climbers will be prohibited from starting their ascent between 4pm and 2am. The funds generated will also go towards the construction of shelters in the event of a volcanic eruption.

The Yoshida trail is the mountain’s most popular ascent thanks to easy access from Tokyo and the number of locations en route offering both accommodation and meals. Last year’s year’s visitor numbers were called “unprecedented” by the government. Under the plans, a gate will be installed at the entrance to the Yoshida trail, where the toll, yet to be announced, will be paid.


 



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2024