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Met and Smithsonian team up to train US Army to protect cultural heritage | Planet Attractions
     

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Met and Smithsonian team up to train US Army to protect cultural heritage

The Met and the Smithsonian have worked with the US Army to help train soldiers in preserving and protecting cultural heritage in conflict zones




Captain Blake Ruehrwein speaking with reserve soldiers in The Met’s galleries   Credit: Paula Lobo

The Met has coordinated with the Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative (SCRI) to help train the US military in better protecting cultural heritage during conflict.

The Met - a long-term leader in the protection and restitution of cultural property during conflict - hosted a day-long workshop for the US Army earlier this month.

During the workshop, training sessions were led by curators and conservators from the museum, alongside Corine Wegener, director of SCRI, and Captain Blake Ruehrwein, cultural heritage preservation officer of the 353rd CACOM.

“We really appreciate the Metropolitan Museum of Art inviting the Army's Civil Affairs and Cultural Heritage Preservation Officers,” said Captain Ruehrwein.

“When working in conflict zones, I know this collaboration with the museum will help our soldiers to protect global cultures and heritage so that it is not lost to history.”

During and after World War II, a number of Met staff served as Monuments Men and Women - an international task force that sought to protect Europe’s cultural heritage. The Museum has also contributed content to and hosted the launch of four of the International Council of Museum’s Red Lists, which are an aid to combat illicit trafficking.

Since 2013, the Met has committed to work on disaster response for cultural heritage and property protection through workshops in collaboration with military personnel. The Met also continues to assist other museums in conflict zones, most recently in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Ukraine.

“One of the core missions of The Met is to preserve art for many generations to come, both with our own collection and in collaboration with others wherever and whenever we can,” said Met director Max Hollein.

“Art can bring appreciation and deeper understanding of histories and cultures from across time and around the globe. The Met has a long history of safeguarding the world's heritage, and we look forward to continuing these critical efforts and productive partnerships.”


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Met and Smithsonian team up to train US Army to protect cultural heritage | Planet Attractions
news

Met and Smithsonian team up to train US Army to protect cultural heritage

The Met and the Smithsonian have worked with the US Army to help train soldiers in preserving and protecting cultural heritage in conflict zones




Captain Blake Ruehrwein speaking with reserve soldiers in The Met’s galleries   Credit: Paula Lobo

The Met has coordinated with the Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative (SCRI) to help train the US military in better protecting cultural heritage during conflict.

The Met - a long-term leader in the protection and restitution of cultural property during conflict - hosted a day-long workshop for the US Army earlier this month.

During the workshop, training sessions were led by curators and conservators from the museum, alongside Corine Wegener, director of SCRI, and Captain Blake Ruehrwein, cultural heritage preservation officer of the 353rd CACOM.

“We really appreciate the Metropolitan Museum of Art inviting the Army's Civil Affairs and Cultural Heritage Preservation Officers,” said Captain Ruehrwein.

“When working in conflict zones, I know this collaboration with the museum will help our soldiers to protect global cultures and heritage so that it is not lost to history.”

During and after World War II, a number of Met staff served as Monuments Men and Women - an international task force that sought to protect Europe’s cultural heritage. The Museum has also contributed content to and hosted the launch of four of the International Council of Museum’s Red Lists, which are an aid to combat illicit trafficking.

Since 2013, the Met has committed to work on disaster response for cultural heritage and property protection through workshops in collaboration with military personnel. The Met also continues to assist other museums in conflict zones, most recently in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Ukraine.

“One of the core missions of The Met is to preserve art for many generations to come, both with our own collection and in collaboration with others wherever and whenever we can,” said Met director Max Hollein.

“Art can bring appreciation and deeper understanding of histories and cultures from across time and around the globe. The Met has a long history of safeguarding the world's heritage, and we look forward to continuing these critical efforts and productive partnerships.”


 



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