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Eye-tracking technology can identify different fish in an aquarium and tell the user what they’re looking at | Planet Attractions
     

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Eye-tracking technology can identify different fish in an aquarium and tell the user what they’re looking at

A new technology from the Industrial Technology Research Institute can display information about different animals inside aquariums by tracking the eye movements of the user




The AI Aquarium uses multiple cameras to track eye movements and the positions of the fish before displaying information about the different species in the visitor’s line of sight

A new technology that could prove a game changer for aquariums is utilising eye tracking technology to show a user in real time information about the creature they are looking at.

Called the AI Aquarium, the innovative system developed by the Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) in Hsinchu, Taiwan, utilises dynamic object recognition and augmented reality (AR) to recognise and display information about different fish species in a visitor’s eye line.

The system can recognise different fish species with 98% accuracy, regardless of water clarity, movement and light, and tracks both the fish’s positions and the visitors’ eye movements.

An outward-facing, depth-sensing 3D camera, mounted above the tank, tracks viewers’ eye movements. A second camera inside the tank tracks the positions of the fish. Video captured on the second camera is then analysed by the object recognition algorithm, which uses a photo database to visually identify the species.

The eye movements are then compared with the fish positions before the information is delivered to a transparent micro LED screen inside the viewer’s eye line. Additional gesture recognition technology enables users to learn more with simple hand gestures, while audio and video can be used to enhance the experience.

“AI Aquarium incorporates dynamic object recognition technology with an intuitive user interface to provide an intelligent self-guided experience,” said a statement from ITRI.

“Observers can learn about marine life in real-time and access detailed information via gesture control. AI Aquarium recognises more than 10 gestures, creating an entertaining and interactive human-machine interface.”

The AI Aquarium system is already in place at the National Museum of Marine Science and Technology in Keelung, Taiwan, and was recently recognised in the CES Innovation Awards.

“This innovation addresses the needs in the post-pandemic era and the trends of the immersive experience,” said ITRI president Edwin Liu.

“It has been applied in the National Museum of Marine Science and Technology in Taiwan to enhance marine exploration and education, offering a more interactive and effective option than conventional aquariums.”


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Eye-tracking technology can identify different fish in an aquarium and tell the user what they’re looking at | Planet Attractions
video

Eye-tracking technology can identify different fish in an aquarium and tell the user what they’re looking at

A new technology from the Industrial Technology Research Institute can display information about different animals inside aquariums by tracking the eye movements of the user



The AI Aquarium uses multiple cameras to track eye movements and the positions of the fish before displaying information about the different species in the visitor’s line of sight

A new technology that could prove a game changer for aquariums is utilising eye tracking technology to show a user in real time information about the creature they are looking at.

Called the AI Aquarium, the innovative system developed by the Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) in Hsinchu, Taiwan, utilises dynamic object recognition and augmented reality (AR) to recognise and display information about different fish species in a visitor’s eye line.

The system can recognise different fish species with 98% accuracy, regardless of water clarity, movement and light, and tracks both the fish’s positions and the visitors’ eye movements.

An outward-facing, depth-sensing 3D camera, mounted above the tank, tracks viewers’ eye movements. A second camera inside the tank tracks the positions of the fish. Video captured on the second camera is then analysed by the object recognition algorithm, which uses a photo database to visually identify the species.

The eye movements are then compared with the fish positions before the information is delivered to a transparent micro LED screen inside the viewer’s eye line. Additional gesture recognition technology enables users to learn more with simple hand gestures, while audio and video can be used to enhance the experience.

“AI Aquarium incorporates dynamic object recognition technology with an intuitive user interface to provide an intelligent self-guided experience,” said a statement from ITRI.

“Observers can learn about marine life in real-time and access detailed information via gesture control. AI Aquarium recognises more than 10 gestures, creating an entertaining and interactive human-machine interface.”

The AI Aquarium system is already in place at the National Museum of Marine Science and Technology in Keelung, Taiwan, and was recently recognised in the CES Innovation Awards.

“This innovation addresses the needs in the post-pandemic era and the trends of the immersive experience,” said ITRI president Edwin Liu.

“It has been applied in the National Museum of Marine Science and Technology in Taiwan to enhance marine exploration and education, offering a more interactive and effective option than conventional aquariums.”


 



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2023