About Subscribe Submit news Get in touch
 
Home Opinion In depth Video LIVE Interviews Jobs
‘Bloody expensive’: ABBA need to recoup £140m to cover costs of virtual Voyage residency | Planet Attractions
     

news

‘Bloody expensive’: ABBA need to recoup £140m to cover costs of virtual Voyage residency

Pop supergroup ABBA need to earn £140m from ticket sales of their London residency Voyage to cover the cost of the virtual spectacle




ABBA Voyage opened at the end of May and sees realistic avatars take to the stage for a 95-minute performance of the band’s greatest hits

Pop supergroup ABBA has revealed that they will need to earn £140m (€164m, US$175m) to cover the cost of their virtual London residency; Voyage.

Opened at the end of May 2022, Voyage sees realistic 3D holograms of the group, dubbed ABBAtars, take to the stage for a 95-minute performance of the band’s greatest hits, including classics such as Mamma Mia, Dancing Queen and The Winner Takes It All, accompanied by a 10-piece live band.

The show, crafted by George Lucas’ special effect company, Industrial Light & Magic used motion-capture technology to create the performances, with “every mannerism and every motion” of the band, who are now in their 70s, captured as they performed.

“Agnetha, Frida, Benny and Björn got on stage in front of 160 cameras and almost as many VFX geniuses and they performed every song in this show to perfection, over five weeks,” explained show producer Ludvig Andersson.

“When you see this show, it’s not four people pretending to be ABBA, it’s actually them,” he added.

Despite the significant investment, the band has shunned corporate sponsorships, opting for a single partnership with Swedish environmentally-conscious maritime company; Oceanbird.

Instead, the group is depending on ticket sales to raise the money, with approximately 380,000 tickets sold so far for the show, held in purpose-built 3,000-capacity ABBA Arena in Stratford, East London.

Andersson told The Telegraph that the reason no other band had tried to do something similar was “Because it’s so bloody expensive.” Adding: “We also need lots of people to come and see it for a very long time.”

The show, which is currently scheduled to run until May 2023, could run in London for an additional three years or be moved to a new location. A world tour is another possibility, with the custom arena, designed by architecture firm Stufish, being both demountable and transportable.

Speaking to Variety ABBA band member Benny Andersson said: “I think we’re exactly in the right spot here in London.”

“The English people have always treated us like we were theirs for some odd reason, for which I’m very humbly grateful.”


Technology

 

The museum that’s introduced special glasses to help colour-blind people see art in a whole new light





Merlin introduces career acceleration scheme for frontline staff





From The Community: The Bizzare Garfield dark ride, Alton Towers as an F1 track and how Disneyland is responsible for the creation of Doritos




Industry insights



Two sustainability mantras from the House of Gucci movie



Video



WATCH: Go behind the scenes of Epcot’s Guardians of the Galaxy: Cosmic Rewind


In Depth



Land, sea and everywhere in between: WhiteWater’s global openings for 2022



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2022
About Subscribe Get in touch
 
Opinion In depth Video LIVE
Jobs
‘Bloody expensive’: ABBA need to recoup £140m to cover costs of virtual Voyage residency | Planet Attractions

news

‘Bloody expensive’: ABBA need to recoup £140m to cover costs of virtual Voyage residency

Pop supergroup ABBA need to earn £140m from ticket sales of their London residency Voyage to cover the cost of the virtual spectacle




ABBA Voyage opened at the end of May and sees realistic avatars take to the stage for a 95-minute performance of the band’s greatest hits

Pop supergroup ABBA has revealed that they will need to earn £140m (€164m, US$175m) to cover the cost of their virtual London residency; Voyage.

Opened at the end of May 2022, Voyage sees realistic 3D holograms of the group, dubbed ABBAtars, take to the stage for a 95-minute performance of the band’s greatest hits, including classics such as Mamma Mia, Dancing Queen and The Winner Takes It All, accompanied by a 10-piece live band.

The show, crafted by George Lucas’ special effect company, Industrial Light & Magic used motion-capture technology to create the performances, with “every mannerism and every motion” of the band, who are now in their 70s, captured as they performed.

“Agnetha, Frida, Benny and Björn got on stage in front of 160 cameras and almost as many VFX geniuses and they performed every song in this show to perfection, over five weeks,” explained show producer Ludvig Andersson.

“When you see this show, it’s not four people pretending to be ABBA, it’s actually them,” he added.

Despite the significant investment, the band has shunned corporate sponsorships, opting for a single partnership with Swedish environmentally-conscious maritime company; Oceanbird.

Instead, the group is depending on ticket sales to raise the money, with approximately 380,000 tickets sold so far for the show, held in purpose-built 3,000-capacity ABBA Arena in Stratford, East London.

Andersson told The Telegraph that the reason no other band had tried to do something similar was “Because it’s so bloody expensive.” Adding: “We also need lots of people to come and see it for a very long time.”

The show, which is currently scheduled to run until May 2023, could run in London for an additional three years or be moved to a new location. A world tour is another possibility, with the custom arena, designed by architecture firm Stufish, being both demountable and transportable.

Speaking to Variety ABBA band member Benny Andersson said: “I think we’re exactly in the right spot here in London.”

“The English people have always treated us like we were theirs for some odd reason, for which I’m very humbly grateful.”


 



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2022