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Two charged over felling of famous Sycamore Gap tree | Planet Attractions
     

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Two charged over felling of famous Sycamore Gap tree

Two men have been charged with criminal damage following the felling of the famous Sycamore Gap tree along Hadrian’s Wall




The Sycamore Gap tree was an icon of Hadrian’s Wall

Two men have been charged with criminal damage following the felling of a famous tree in a Unesco World Heritage Site.

The Sycamore Gap tree was a famous landmark across the Hadrian’s Wall site in northeast England. Located in a dramatic dip in the landscape along the ancient roman wall, which stretches 73 miles (118km) from coast to coast, the tree, which stood for about 200 years, was found cut down in September 2023. It's felling also caused damage to the wall itself.

Prosecutors have charged Daniel Graham, 38, and Adam Carruthers, 31, with causing criminal damage to Hadrian's Wall, with the pair set to appear before magistrates on May 15. Both men were arrested in October last year and had been on bail since then.

“There has been an ongoing investigation since the Sycamore Gap tree was cut down,” said Det Ch Insp Rebecca Fenney, the senior investigation officer in the case.

“As a result of those inquiries, two men have now been charged.

“We recognise the strength of feeling in the local community and further afield the felling has caused, however we would remind people to avoid speculation, including online, which could impact the ongoing case.”

The tree was named English tree of the year in a Woodland Trust competition in 2016. It also featured in the 1991 film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves.

Following the act, efforts are being made to see if the tree can be regrown from its stump or if it can be replaced by sapling from its seeds.


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Two charged over felling of famous Sycamore Gap tree | Planet Attractions
news

Two charged over felling of famous Sycamore Gap tree

Two men have been charged with criminal damage following the felling of the famous Sycamore Gap tree along Hadrian’s Wall




The Sycamore Gap tree was an icon of Hadrian’s Wall

Two men have been charged with criminal damage following the felling of a famous tree in a Unesco World Heritage Site.

The Sycamore Gap tree was a famous landmark across the Hadrian’s Wall site in northeast England. Located in a dramatic dip in the landscape along the ancient roman wall, which stretches 73 miles (118km) from coast to coast, the tree, which stood for about 200 years, was found cut down in September 2023. It's felling also caused damage to the wall itself.

Prosecutors have charged Daniel Graham, 38, and Adam Carruthers, 31, with causing criminal damage to Hadrian's Wall, with the pair set to appear before magistrates on May 15. Both men were arrested in October last year and had been on bail since then.

“There has been an ongoing investigation since the Sycamore Gap tree was cut down,” said Det Ch Insp Rebecca Fenney, the senior investigation officer in the case.

“As a result of those inquiries, two men have now been charged.

“We recognise the strength of feeling in the local community and further afield the felling has caused, however we would remind people to avoid speculation, including online, which could impact the ongoing case.”

The tree was named English tree of the year in a Woodland Trust competition in 2016. It also featured in the 1991 film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves.

Following the act, efforts are being made to see if the tree can be regrown from its stump or if it can be replaced by sapling from its seeds.


 



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