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Gaming with your hands: Ultraleap introduces new hand-tracking technology for VR headsets | Planet Attractions
     

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Gaming with your hands: Ultraleap introduces new hand-tracking technology for VR headsets

Ultraleap is introducing a new tool to allow the use of hand tracking while wearing a Pico Neo 3 VR headset




Early access to Ultraleap’s Hand Tracking Accessory is available now for developers, evaluation, and proof of concepts

Haptic and hand tracking technology specialist Ultraleap has announced the release of a new technology which could replace or supplement traditional gaming controllers with natural interaction using only the hands.

Called the Hand Tracking Accessory, Ultraleap says the device “could prove a gamechanger” for VR use in exhibits and Location-Based Entertainment (LBE) where complex interactions or challenging environments are the norms.

Available for use with the Pico Neo 3 VR headset, the technology utilises the Ultraleap Stereo IR 170 hand tracking camera, which is mounted and paired with Ultraleap’s Gemini software, to make it so the user controls the action through the use of their hands. For attractions where digital competency can vastly differ between each visitor, Ultraleap says that the use of their own hands makes the tech much easier for first time users to understand. An added bonus is that in addition to offering a more natural experience, hand tracking means that onboard time is reduced, increasing visitor throughput.

“When applications need the highest performing hand tracking for complex interactions or challenging environments, Ultraleap’s hand tracking really is world-class,” said Leland Hedges, GM for Pico Interactive Europe. “We can’t wait to see what developers and organisations will create from this joint effort.”

Early access of the accessory is available now for developers, evaluation, and proof of concepts, with the full bundle for scalable deployments coming in the summer of 2022.

“We’re already seeing significant wins from customers who have deployed VR training programmes or LBE experiences with hand tracking,” said Matt Tullis, VP, XR at Ultraleap.

“This first phase of the Pico relationship will mean more developers and organisations will be able to test, pilot and refine their applications to unlock the true power of VR now and deploy at scale in a few months.”


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Gaming with your hands: Ultraleap introduces new hand-tracking technology for VR headsets | Planet Attractions

news

Gaming with your hands: Ultraleap introduces new hand-tracking technology for VR headsets

Ultraleap is introducing a new tool to allow the use of hand tracking while wearing a Pico Neo 3 VR headset




Early access to Ultraleap’s Hand Tracking Accessory is available now for developers, evaluation, and proof of concepts

Haptic and hand tracking technology specialist Ultraleap has announced the release of a new technology which could replace or supplement traditional gaming controllers with natural interaction using only the hands.

Called the Hand Tracking Accessory, Ultraleap says the device “could prove a gamechanger” for VR use in exhibits and Location-Based Entertainment (LBE) where complex interactions or challenging environments are the norms.

Available for use with the Pico Neo 3 VR headset, the technology utilises the Ultraleap Stereo IR 170 hand tracking camera, which is mounted and paired with Ultraleap’s Gemini software, to make it so the user controls the action through the use of their hands. For attractions where digital competency can vastly differ between each visitor, Ultraleap says that the use of their own hands makes the tech much easier for first time users to understand. An added bonus is that in addition to offering a more natural experience, hand tracking means that onboard time is reduced, increasing visitor throughput.

“When applications need the highest performing hand tracking for complex interactions or challenging environments, Ultraleap’s hand tracking really is world-class,” said Leland Hedges, GM for Pico Interactive Europe. “We can’t wait to see what developers and organisations will create from this joint effort.”

Early access of the accessory is available now for developers, evaluation, and proof of concepts, with the full bundle for scalable deployments coming in the summer of 2022.

“We’re already seeing significant wins from customers who have deployed VR training programmes or LBE experiences with hand tracking,” said Matt Tullis, VP, XR at Ultraleap.

“This first phase of the Pico relationship will mean more developers and organisations will be able to test, pilot and refine their applications to unlock the true power of VR now and deploy at scale in a few months.”


 



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