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Attractions across the world pay tribute to Queen Elizabeth II following her death | Planet Attractions
     

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Attractions across the world pay tribute to Queen Elizabeth II following her death

The attractions community has been sharing stories of the profound impact Queen Elizabeth II had on some of Britain’s most beloved institutions, paying tribute to the monarch following her death, aged 96




The Queen officially opened ZSL Whipsnade Zoo’s Centre for Elephant Care in 2017   Credit: ZSL

Attractions across Britain and the rest of the world have paid tribute to Queen Elizabeth II following her death, aged 96.

The Queen's death has sparked a massive outpouring of emotion from people across the world, with thousands of mourners gathering outside Buckingham Palace and a multitude of cities across the commonwealth and beyond.

For the visitor attractions community, the Queen had a huge impact on some of Britain’s most beloved attractions and institutions, helping to boost awareness, support them as a patron and more.

The Queen was a strong supporter of London’s Science Museum and the wide Science Museum Group, showing her appreciation for the transformative power of science and technology during visits to the institution over the years.

Sir Ian Blatchford, who is director and chief executive of the science museum group and who was knighted by the Queen in the 2019 New Year’s Honours list, said her visits to the museum were an honour.

“I feel deeply honoured to have had the privilege to welcome her to the Science Museum several times and to have witnessed her particular delight at meeting some of our younger visitors. Queen Elizabeth II was wise, warm and true,” he said.

“Queen Elizabeth II’s relationship with the Science Museum began on 21 March 1938, when as an eleven-year-old princess, she toured the museum with sister Princess Margaret and grandmother Queen Mary.

“Queen Elizabeth II’s final visit to the Science Museum took place in March 2019, when The Queen made her first Instagram post, announced a major exhibition, Top Secret: From Ciphers to Cyber Security, and opened a new supporters’ centre.

“Queen Elizabeth II saw many scientific advancements during her lifetime and showed appreciation for the transformative power of science and technology during visits to the Science Museum. It is with profound sadness that we mark the end of her reign.”


The V&A Museum shared a photograph taken in 1968, releasing a statement about the impact the Queen had on the institution during her reign.

“Her Majesty The Queen leaves behind an astounding historic legacy, not least in her commitment to cultural institutions and civic society,” read the statement.

“From its 19th-century foundations by Prince Albert and Queen Victoria, the V&A has enjoyed a proud history of Royal support, and we have been privileged to receive the ongoing support of Queen Elizabeth II in our own era. The V&A has hosted numerous visits from The Queen over the years: from exhibition openings (World in the Bible in 1965; the popular Sovereign exhibition in 1992; and A Grand Design in 1999) to the official openings of new museum quarters such as the Henry Cole Wing in 1983 and the Nehru Gallery of Indian Art in 1991. During her last visit to the V&A in 1999, The Queen also unveiled the magnificent Dale Chihuly chandelier that has hung under the dome of the main entrance at South Kensington ever since. The V&A was honoured to lead the national design competition for the 2022 Platinum Jubilee Emblem.

“Over many years, by gracious permission of Her Majesty The Queen, the V&A has been privileged to house an incredible 104 objects lent from the Royal Collection.

“Perhaps the most admired of these Royal loans are the Raphael Cartoons, housed in the V&A’s Raphael Court. In April 1865, the Cartoons were removed from Hampton Court and installed in the South Kensington Museum (the V&A’s predecessor) – personally loaned by Queen Victoria in memory of Prince Albert. They have been an important part of the Royal Collection since the 1600s but have been on public display at the V&A for over 150 years.”


The Natural History Museum in London was another popular choice for the Queen, who visited the attraction many times during her life.

“Her sense of duty and devotion to a life of service was matched by her care for the natural world,” said the museum in a statement posted on social media, also sharing an image of the Queen from a historic visit to the museum.

“This inspirational legacy lives on in the commitment demonstrated by her family to the health of our planet.”


The National Portrait Gallery shared a stunning image of the Queen on social media, taken by Annie Leibovitz in 2007.
Currently closed due to a major redevelopment, the gallery has also shared an online look at the Queen’s life through portraits held at the institution.

“A figurehead of stability, hope and kindness, she carried out royal engagements – including the opening of the National Portrait Gallery’s Ondaatje Wing on 4 May 2000 – until the end of her reign, and was royal patron or president of over 600 charities, military bodies and public service organisations,” said the gallery, in a statement.

“Our deepest sympathy goes out to the Royal Family, with the nation sharing in their grief.”


The British Museum shared a historical image of a visit from the Queen to the institution in 1972. In the image, she is looking at the mask of Tutankhamun.

In a statement, the museum’s director, Hartwig Fischer, said: “The Trustees and staff of the British Museum are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Her Majesty The Queen.

“Our thoughts are with the Royal Family. We have been honoured by, and fondly remember, Her Majesty’s steadfast support for the Museum throughout her reign.

“The Museum will honour the Queen’s memory by flying the flag at half-mast, observing a one-minute silence at the appropriate moment, and senior staff will wear black ties and armbands during the period of mourning. A book of condolence has been placed in the Great Court for visitors to sign, should they wish.

“Museum-hosted events will be cancelled during the period of mourning and the Museum will be closed on the day of Her Majesty’s funeral.”


The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) was among those in the capital to share its condolences. The Queen was Patron of ZSL from her coronation in 1953 and had been deeply involved in working to protect wildlife worldwide.

“Her support for our work, and passion for animals has helped us to inspire millions to protect wildlife around the world,” said a statement. “It has been our great privilege to welcome The Queen to our zoos throughout her life.

“Her passion for animals will be remembered and her legacy will live on as we continue to work for a world where wildlife thrives.”



As a mark of respect, both London and Whipsnade Zoos did not open on September 9.



Chester Zoo said it was deeply saddened to hear of the Queen’s passing, sharing images of a visit to the animal attraction in 2012.

“I know many staff and visitors alike will continue to share wonderful memories of a very special day in our zoo’s history when The Queen, along with The Duke of Edinburgh, kindly visited us in 2012 and officially opened our Jubilee Quarter, located at the main entrance area, giving it the royal seal of approval,” said Jamie Christon, CEO of Chester Zoo.

“During the visit, The Queen showed great interest in our vital conservation work, particularly our efforts to prevent the extinction of critically endangered eastern black rhinos - both here at the zoo and with our partners at the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania, Africa.

“The zoo will remain open tomorrow (Friday) but will close on the date of the State Funeral.

“Everyone at the zoo has the royal family in their thoughts at this time.”


Legoland Windsor announced the closure of its park for September 9 as a sign of respect. The park also shared an image of the Queen in Lego format.

“We are extremely saddened to hear of the passing of HM Queen Elizabeth II. Our thoughts are with all the Royal Family at this deeply sad time,” said the park. “Out of respect the Resort will be closed tomorrow.”

In a further statement posted on the park’s website it said: “As a mark of respect following the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, the theme park will be closed on 9 September 2022. Our hotels will remain open. This will allow staff and guests to pay their respects to Her Majesty.”


In Australia, where the Queen was constitutional monarch, The National Museum of Australia shared its condolences, sharing an image of the Queen’s visit in 2000 and of the Daimler car used in her first visit as monarch in 1954.

“As the country’s head of state, Queen Elizabeth has a special place in the hearts of many Australians, having visited the country 16 times during her reign,” said the museum in a statement.

“During her first historic 1954 tour, an estimated 70 per cent of Australians turned out to see the newly crowned young Queen.

“As the Crown passes to King Charles III, we mourn her passing and reflect on her seven decades as sovereign.”


In the US, the Empire State Building has honoured the Queen by illuminating the iconic building in purple and silver.


And finally, Andy Hine, chairman of The Roller Coaster Club of Great Britain, shared a personal story of meeting the Queen when awarded an MBE. In a Tweet, Hine said that when he met Her Majesty, she said “rollercoasters, are you crazy?” to which he responded “yes, coaster crazy!”



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Attractions across the world pay tribute to Queen Elizabeth II following her death | Planet Attractions

news

Attractions across the world pay tribute to Queen Elizabeth II following her death

The attractions community has been sharing stories of the profound impact Queen Elizabeth II had on some of Britain’s most beloved institutions, paying tribute to the monarch following her death, aged 96




The Queen officially opened ZSL Whipsnade Zoo’s Centre for Elephant Care in 2017   Credit: ZSL

Attractions across Britain and the rest of the world have paid tribute to Queen Elizabeth II following her death, aged 96.

The Queen's death has sparked a massive outpouring of emotion from people across the world, with thousands of mourners gathering outside Buckingham Palace and a multitude of cities across the commonwealth and beyond.

For the visitor attractions community, the Queen had a huge impact on some of Britain’s most beloved attractions and institutions, helping to boost awareness, support them as a patron and more.

The Queen was a strong supporter of London’s Science Museum and the wide Science Museum Group, showing her appreciation for the transformative power of science and technology during visits to the institution over the years.

Sir Ian Blatchford, who is director and chief executive of the science museum group and who was knighted by the Queen in the 2019 New Year’s Honours list, said her visits to the museum were an honour.

“I feel deeply honoured to have had the privilege to welcome her to the Science Museum several times and to have witnessed her particular delight at meeting some of our younger visitors. Queen Elizabeth II was wise, warm and true,” he said.

“Queen Elizabeth II’s relationship with the Science Museum began on 21 March 1938, when as an eleven-year-old princess, she toured the museum with sister Princess Margaret and grandmother Queen Mary.

“Queen Elizabeth II’s final visit to the Science Museum took place in March 2019, when The Queen made her first Instagram post, announced a major exhibition, Top Secret: From Ciphers to Cyber Security, and opened a new supporters’ centre.

“Queen Elizabeth II saw many scientific advancements during her lifetime and showed appreciation for the transformative power of science and technology during visits to the Science Museum. It is with profound sadness that we mark the end of her reign.”


The V&A Museum shared a photograph taken in 1968, releasing a statement about the impact the Queen had on the institution during her reign.

“Her Majesty The Queen leaves behind an astounding historic legacy, not least in her commitment to cultural institutions and civic society,” read the statement.

“From its 19th-century foundations by Prince Albert and Queen Victoria, the V&A has enjoyed a proud history of Royal support, and we have been privileged to receive the ongoing support of Queen Elizabeth II in our own era. The V&A has hosted numerous visits from The Queen over the years: from exhibition openings (World in the Bible in 1965; the popular Sovereign exhibition in 1992; and A Grand Design in 1999) to the official openings of new museum quarters such as the Henry Cole Wing in 1983 and the Nehru Gallery of Indian Art in 1991. During her last visit to the V&A in 1999, The Queen also unveiled the magnificent Dale Chihuly chandelier that has hung under the dome of the main entrance at South Kensington ever since. The V&A was honoured to lead the national design competition for the 2022 Platinum Jubilee Emblem.

“Over many years, by gracious permission of Her Majesty The Queen, the V&A has been privileged to house an incredible 104 objects lent from the Royal Collection.

“Perhaps the most admired of these Royal loans are the Raphael Cartoons, housed in the V&A’s Raphael Court. In April 1865, the Cartoons were removed from Hampton Court and installed in the South Kensington Museum (the V&A’s predecessor) – personally loaned by Queen Victoria in memory of Prince Albert. They have been an important part of the Royal Collection since the 1600s but have been on public display at the V&A for over 150 years.”


The Natural History Museum in London was another popular choice for the Queen, who visited the attraction many times during her life.

“Her sense of duty and devotion to a life of service was matched by her care for the natural world,” said the museum in a statement posted on social media, also sharing an image of the Queen from a historic visit to the museum.

“This inspirational legacy lives on in the commitment demonstrated by her family to the health of our planet.”


The National Portrait Gallery shared a stunning image of the Queen on social media, taken by Annie Leibovitz in 2007.
Currently closed due to a major redevelopment, the gallery has also shared an online look at the Queen’s life through portraits held at the institution.

“A figurehead of stability, hope and kindness, she carried out royal engagements – including the opening of the National Portrait Gallery’s Ondaatje Wing on 4 May 2000 – until the end of her reign, and was royal patron or president of over 600 charities, military bodies and public service organisations,” said the gallery, in a statement.

“Our deepest sympathy goes out to the Royal Family, with the nation sharing in their grief.”


The British Museum shared a historical image of a visit from the Queen to the institution in 1972. In the image, she is looking at the mask of Tutankhamun.

In a statement, the museum’s director, Hartwig Fischer, said: “The Trustees and staff of the British Museum are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Her Majesty The Queen.

“Our thoughts are with the Royal Family. We have been honoured by, and fondly remember, Her Majesty’s steadfast support for the Museum throughout her reign.

“The Museum will honour the Queen’s memory by flying the flag at half-mast, observing a one-minute silence at the appropriate moment, and senior staff will wear black ties and armbands during the period of mourning. A book of condolence has been placed in the Great Court for visitors to sign, should they wish.

“Museum-hosted events will be cancelled during the period of mourning and the Museum will be closed on the day of Her Majesty’s funeral.”


The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) was among those in the capital to share its condolences. The Queen was Patron of ZSL from her coronation in 1953 and had been deeply involved in working to protect wildlife worldwide.

“Her support for our work, and passion for animals has helped us to inspire millions to protect wildlife around the world,” said a statement. “It has been our great privilege to welcome The Queen to our zoos throughout her life.

“Her passion for animals will be remembered and her legacy will live on as we continue to work for a world where wildlife thrives.”



As a mark of respect, both London and Whipsnade Zoos did not open on September 9.



Chester Zoo said it was deeply saddened to hear of the Queen’s passing, sharing images of a visit to the animal attraction in 2012.

“I know many staff and visitors alike will continue to share wonderful memories of a very special day in our zoo’s history when The Queen, along with The Duke of Edinburgh, kindly visited us in 2012 and officially opened our Jubilee Quarter, located at the main entrance area, giving it the royal seal of approval,” said Jamie Christon, CEO of Chester Zoo.

“During the visit, The Queen showed great interest in our vital conservation work, particularly our efforts to prevent the extinction of critically endangered eastern black rhinos - both here at the zoo and with our partners at the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania, Africa.

“The zoo will remain open tomorrow (Friday) but will close on the date of the State Funeral.

“Everyone at the zoo has the royal family in their thoughts at this time.”


Legoland Windsor announced the closure of its park for September 9 as a sign of respect. The park also shared an image of the Queen in Lego format.

“We are extremely saddened to hear of the passing of HM Queen Elizabeth II. Our thoughts are with all the Royal Family at this deeply sad time,” said the park. “Out of respect the Resort will be closed tomorrow.”

In a further statement posted on the park’s website it said: “As a mark of respect following the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, the theme park will be closed on 9 September 2022. Our hotels will remain open. This will allow staff and guests to pay their respects to Her Majesty.”


In Australia, where the Queen was constitutional monarch, The National Museum of Australia shared its condolences, sharing an image of the Queen’s visit in 2000 and of the Daimler car used in her first visit as monarch in 1954.

“As the country’s head of state, Queen Elizabeth has a special place in the hearts of many Australians, having visited the country 16 times during her reign,” said the museum in a statement.

“During her first historic 1954 tour, an estimated 70 per cent of Australians turned out to see the newly crowned young Queen.

“As the Crown passes to King Charles III, we mourn her passing and reflect on her seven decades as sovereign.”


In the US, the Empire State Building has honoured the Queen by illuminating the iconic building in purple and silver.


And finally, Andy Hine, chairman of The Roller Coaster Club of Great Britain, shared a personal story of meeting the Queen when awarded an MBE. In a Tweet, Hine said that when he met Her Majesty, she said “rollercoasters, are you crazy?” to which he responded “yes, coaster crazy!”



 



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2022