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Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum launches The Open Era gallery

The redeveloped ‘The Open Era’ gallery is now open to the public at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum




In the rivalries section of the gallery, there are sculptured mannequins of six legendary tennis players   Credit: Mather and Co

The Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum is celebrating the launch of its redeveloped ‘The Open Era’ gallery, with Mather and Co handling exhibition design on the project.

Mather, which also designed the wider museum when it first opened in 2006, worked closely with The All England Lawn Tennis Club on the new exhibition, which aims to put the visitor in the player's shoes.

Split into several areas, the first explores Broadcasting at Wimbledon. In this part of the exhibition, visitors are faced with an interactive AV graphic wall, which explains how people have consumed information about Wimbledon over the years – from the oldest coverage to present-day technologies.

Next, visitors can explore the experiences of top tennis players from the last sixty years. One interactive, for example, compares Arthur Ashe’s Wimbledon win in 1975 to that of Emma Raducanu’s experience in 2021.

Moving to the Dressing Room - a space that is not part of the official Wimbledon tour, or filmed or publicised on social media - an interactive bench and lockers in the gallery offer a ‘behind the scenes’ experience to visitors. Additionally, visitors can choose from a push-button menu of stories about the Dressing Rooms as told by the players themselves.

Finally, the Rivalries section showcases six sculptured mannequins of legendary tennis players including Roger Federer and Martina Navratilova. Behind each of the mannequins, a video presentation shows great rivals compete on Centre Court, condensed into a few minutes, with multiple matches combined to give the impression of one continuous game.

“We aim to give everyone who visits us an unforgettable Wimbledon experience, said Emma Traherne, curator at Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum.

“The new interactives and display techniques used in this redevelopment really help to show what it is like to be a top tennis player and it has been exciting to work with Mather to realise our vision.”


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Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum launches The Open Era gallery | Planet Attractions

news

Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum launches The Open Era gallery

The redeveloped ‘The Open Era’ gallery is now open to the public at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum




In the rivalries section of the gallery, there are sculptured mannequins of six legendary tennis players   Credit: Mather and Co

The Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum is celebrating the launch of its redeveloped ‘The Open Era’ gallery, with Mather and Co handling exhibition design on the project.

Mather, which also designed the wider museum when it first opened in 2006, worked closely with The All England Lawn Tennis Club on the new exhibition, which aims to put the visitor in the player's shoes.

Split into several areas, the first explores Broadcasting at Wimbledon. In this part of the exhibition, visitors are faced with an interactive AV graphic wall, which explains how people have consumed information about Wimbledon over the years – from the oldest coverage to present-day technologies.

Next, visitors can explore the experiences of top tennis players from the last sixty years. One interactive, for example, compares Arthur Ashe’s Wimbledon win in 1975 to that of Emma Raducanu’s experience in 2021.

Moving to the Dressing Room - a space that is not part of the official Wimbledon tour, or filmed or publicised on social media - an interactive bench and lockers in the gallery offer a ‘behind the scenes’ experience to visitors. Additionally, visitors can choose from a push-button menu of stories about the Dressing Rooms as told by the players themselves.

Finally, the Rivalries section showcases six sculptured mannequins of legendary tennis players including Roger Federer and Martina Navratilova. Behind each of the mannequins, a video presentation shows great rivals compete on Centre Court, condensed into a few minutes, with multiple matches combined to give the impression of one continuous game.

“We aim to give everyone who visits us an unforgettable Wimbledon experience, said Emma Traherne, curator at Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum.

“The new interactives and display techniques used in this redevelopment really help to show what it is like to be a top tennis player and it has been exciting to work with Mather to realise our vision.”


 



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2022