About Subscribe Submit news Get in touch
 
Home Opinion In depth Video LIVE news Interviews Company profiles Events diary Jobs
Lethal force allegations made against Saudi Arabia’s The Line | Planet Attractions
     

news

Lethal force allegations made against Saudi Arabia’s The Line

An ex-intelligence officer from Saudi Arabia has alleged that Saudi forces were instructed to use ‘lethal force’ against those resisting relocation as a result of the under-construction linear mega city The Line




Saudi Arabia’s The Line project has come under fire once again   Credit: NEOM

Saudi Arabia’s planned linear city, The Line, is in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons again, following allegations that authorities permitted the use of lethal force to clear land designated for the futuristic project.

Speaking to the BBC, ex-Saudi intelligence officer Col Rabi Alenezi told the British broadcaster that he was ordered to evict villagers from a tribe in the Gulf state to make way for The Line, with one person shot and subsequently killed for protesting against the forced eviction.

The US$500bn (€474.6bn, £407.6bn) linear city - which will be 200m (660ft) wide, 170km (106mi) long, and 500m (1,640ft) above sea level - has been described as “civilisational revolution that puts humans first.” It will feature numerous cultural attractions and will act as a cruise hub for the region.

So far, more than 6,000 people have been moved for the project according to the Saudi government, though the figure is thought to be higher.

According to Alenezi, who has since gone into exile in the UK, the clearance order affected al-Khuraybah, a village 4.5km (2.8mi) south of The Line populated by a tribe who have inhabited the region for generations.

The report said the tribe was made up of “many rebels” and “whoever continues to resist [eviction] should be killed”, licensing the use of lethal force against whoever stayed in their homes.

According to the BBC, it was not able to verify Col Alenezi's comments about lethal force, though a source familiar with the matter said the testimony was “in line with what they knew about such missions more generally”.

In May last year, The Line’s development came under fire after it was revealed that three people evicted from their homes faced execution under a law that the UN said did not meet international human rights standards. According to the UN, the trio were charged with terrorism, when they were actually “resisting forced evictions in the name of the Neom project”.

Once complete, the city will be home to nine million people. The work is slow though, with only 2.4km (1.5mi) of The Line expected to be completed by 2030. Along with The Line, Neom’s plans include an industrial city, ports and tourism developments.


Culture

 

Christie technology powers immersive experience for Beijing’s Wonderland Science Fiction Exploration Hall





Perth Zoo masterplan in full swing as work starts on multi-million dollar gibbon habitat





Hallmark to launch immersive Christmas-themed experience




Industry insights



Maximising ROI: Revenue strategies for operators



Video



Disneyland Paris renames park ahead of €2bn expansion


In Depth



Hole in One: How Holovis is changing the game with 360Golf



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2024
About Subscribe Get in touch
 
Opinion In depth Interviews
LIVE news Profiles Diary Video
Jobs
Lethal force allegations made against Saudi Arabia’s The Line | Planet Attractions
news

Lethal force allegations made against Saudi Arabia’s The Line

An ex-intelligence officer from Saudi Arabia has alleged that Saudi forces were instructed to use ‘lethal force’ against those resisting relocation as a result of the under-construction linear mega city The Line




Saudi Arabia’s The Line project has come under fire once again   Credit: NEOM

Saudi Arabia’s planned linear city, The Line, is in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons again, following allegations that authorities permitted the use of lethal force to clear land designated for the futuristic project.

Speaking to the BBC, ex-Saudi intelligence officer Col Rabi Alenezi told the British broadcaster that he was ordered to evict villagers from a tribe in the Gulf state to make way for The Line, with one person shot and subsequently killed for protesting against the forced eviction.

The US$500bn (€474.6bn, £407.6bn) linear city - which will be 200m (660ft) wide, 170km (106mi) long, and 500m (1,640ft) above sea level - has been described as “civilisational revolution that puts humans first.” It will feature numerous cultural attractions and will act as a cruise hub for the region.

So far, more than 6,000 people have been moved for the project according to the Saudi government, though the figure is thought to be higher.

According to Alenezi, who has since gone into exile in the UK, the clearance order affected al-Khuraybah, a village 4.5km (2.8mi) south of The Line populated by a tribe who have inhabited the region for generations.

The report said the tribe was made up of “many rebels” and “whoever continues to resist [eviction] should be killed”, licensing the use of lethal force against whoever stayed in their homes.

According to the BBC, it was not able to verify Col Alenezi's comments about lethal force, though a source familiar with the matter said the testimony was “in line with what they knew about such missions more generally”.

In May last year, The Line’s development came under fire after it was revealed that three people evicted from their homes faced execution under a law that the UN said did not meet international human rights standards. According to the UN, the trio were charged with terrorism, when they were actually “resisting forced evictions in the name of the Neom project”.

Once complete, the city will be home to nine million people. The work is slow though, with only 2.4km (1.5mi) of The Line expected to be completed by 2030. Along with The Line, Neom’s plans include an industrial city, ports and tourism developments.


 



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2024