About Subscribe Submit news Get in touch
 
Home Opinion In depth Video LIVE Interviews Jobs
Robotic plant powered by data from Natural History Museum will wilt or grow based on society’s choices over biodiversity | Planet Attractions
     

news

Robotic plant powered by data from Natural History Museum will wilt or grow based on society’s choices over biodiversity

A new art installation powered by data from London’s Natural History Museum will provide an ever-changing visual representation of how society’s choices impact the natural world




‘Econario’ seeks to provide a visual representation of how changes in society affect the natural environment   Credit: Natural History Museum

Ecological artist Thijs Biersteker has created a 5-metre-tall (16.5ft) robotic plant, using biodiversity data from the Natural History Museum, to create a moving monument to the importance of the choices we are making now for the future of our planet.

The artwork titled ‘Econario’ is designed to be a visual representation of how choices society makes today will affect the state of nature over the next thirty years.

The robotic plant will grow and shrink over time, not with the help of nutrients, but driven by changes over time in the Biodiversity Intactness Index (BII) – a metric developed by the Natural History Museum as a measure of how much a region’s natural biodiversity still persists.

As an example, if a country adopts a sustainable scenario, the work will grow to its full length. If however, a country continues to burn fossil fuels as it does in 2022, the work will shrink rapidly back towards its most mechanical state.

The work premiered on August 5 in Dordrecht, Netherlands, and will remain there until November 13 before touring the world in the coming years.

“The numbers around biodiversity loss are cold hard facts, but cold hard facts never grabbed anyone by the heart, said Professor Andy Purvis, a biodiversity researcher at the Natural History Museum.

“With Econario, you feel joy when it grows and becomes more natural; and you feel pain when it wilts. It has soul. And it really brings home what’s at stake.”



Museums and galleries

 

Rollercoaster crash at Legoland Germany leaves 30 injured





RWS to showcase full capabilities at IAAPA Expo Europe following key multi-national acquisitions





Carnival to cut fleetwide emissions by 500,000 metric tons with new sustainability initiative




Industry insights



Some handy tips to get waterpark operators through the busiest time of year



Video



WATCH: Go behind the scenes of Epcot’s Guardians of the Galaxy: Cosmic Rewind


In Depth



Earnings reports: SeaWorld, Cedar Fair and Universal all soar in the face of Covid-19



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2022
About Subscribe Get in touch
 
Opinion In depth Video LIVE
Jobs
Robotic plant powered by data from Natural History Museum will wilt or grow based on society’s choices over biodiversity | Planet Attractions

news

Robotic plant powered by data from Natural History Museum will wilt or grow based on society’s choices over biodiversity

A new art installation powered by data from London’s Natural History Museum will provide an ever-changing visual representation of how society’s choices impact the natural world




‘Econario’ seeks to provide a visual representation of how changes in society affect the natural environment   Credit: Natural History Museum

Ecological artist Thijs Biersteker has created a 5-metre-tall (16.5ft) robotic plant, using biodiversity data from the Natural History Museum, to create a moving monument to the importance of the choices we are making now for the future of our planet.

The artwork titled ‘Econario’ is designed to be a visual representation of how choices society makes today will affect the state of nature over the next thirty years.

The robotic plant will grow and shrink over time, not with the help of nutrients, but driven by changes over time in the Biodiversity Intactness Index (BII) – a metric developed by the Natural History Museum as a measure of how much a region’s natural biodiversity still persists.

As an example, if a country adopts a sustainable scenario, the work will grow to its full length. If however, a country continues to burn fossil fuels as it does in 2022, the work will shrink rapidly back towards its most mechanical state.

The work premiered on August 5 in Dordrecht, Netherlands, and will remain there until November 13 before touring the world in the coming years.

“The numbers around biodiversity loss are cold hard facts, but cold hard facts never grabbed anyone by the heart, said Professor Andy Purvis, a biodiversity researcher at the Natural History Museum.

“With Econario, you feel joy when it grows and becomes more natural; and you feel pain when it wilts. It has soul. And it really brings home what’s at stake.”



 



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2022