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New bill seeks to reopen California’s major theme parks

Legislators in the state want large theme parks including Disneyland to reopen earlier than current COVID guidelines currently allow




Disneyland could finally reopen nearly a year after closing   Credit: James Hartono on Unsplash

Disneyland, Universal Studios Hollywood, Six Flags Magic Mountain and Knott’s Berry Farm could all soon be allowed to reopen nearly a year after closing, with lawmakers pushing for a change to existing Covid guidelines to restart California’s frozen theme park industry.

Current guidance from the state’s governor, Gavin Newsom, currently restricts major theme parks from reopening until the county they are located in achieves “Yellow – Minimal – Tier 4” category.

The rules don't apply to smaller theme parks with a capacity of less than 15,000, however, with state guidance amended in December to allow them to reopen.

If successful, a new bill - named AB420 - would place all theme parks in the “Orange - Moderate - Tier 3” of the state’s Covid-19 Industry Guidance for Amusement Parks and Theme Parks, meaning they could reopen. According to the bill, health authorities should “treat large and small theme parks equally.”

Under these revised guidelines, California’s major theme parks could open at 25% capacity, with indoor dining establishments on-site also allowed to operate at 25%.

Disney, which along with Universal, Knott’s and Magic Mountain, closed in March last year, has long said that the current guidelines are too restrictive. The operators argue that there has not been a single documented case at a theme park, which comes on top of a plan for stringent virus prevention measures in California attractions.

“We deeply appreciate Assembly Members Quirk-Silva and Valladares for their leadership and for introducing legislation on Safe Theme Park Reopening,” said Erin Guerrero, executive director of the California Attractions and Parks Association (CAPA).

“Worldwide, theme parks have proven they can reopen responsibly while protecting the health of guests and staff. Science and data show it can be done. California should allow theme parks to reopen responsibly in the Orange – Moderate – Tier 3.

“California’s iconic theme parks are important economic drivers for the state and local regions. AB 420 is needed so theme parks can plan to reopen responsibly and get back to contributing to the economic recovery of our state.”

Read a draft version of the bill here


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New bill seeks to reopen California’s major theme parks | Planet Attractions

news

New bill seeks to reopen California’s major theme parks

Legislators in the state want large theme parks including Disneyland to reopen earlier than current COVID guidelines currently allow




Disneyland could finally reopen nearly a year after closing   Credit: James Hartono on Unsplash

Disneyland, Universal Studios Hollywood, Six Flags Magic Mountain and Knott’s Berry Farm could all soon be allowed to reopen nearly a year after closing, with lawmakers pushing for a change to existing Covid guidelines to restart California’s frozen theme park industry.

Current guidance from the state’s governor, Gavin Newsom, currently restricts major theme parks from reopening until the county they are located in achieves “Yellow – Minimal – Tier 4” category.

The rules don't apply to smaller theme parks with a capacity of less than 15,000, however, with state guidance amended in December to allow them to reopen.

If successful, a new bill - named AB420 - would place all theme parks in the “Orange - Moderate - Tier 3” of the state’s Covid-19 Industry Guidance for Amusement Parks and Theme Parks, meaning they could reopen. According to the bill, health authorities should “treat large and small theme parks equally.”

Under these revised guidelines, California’s major theme parks could open at 25% capacity, with indoor dining establishments on-site also allowed to operate at 25%.

Disney, which along with Universal, Knott’s and Magic Mountain, closed in March last year, has long said that the current guidelines are too restrictive. The operators argue that there has not been a single documented case at a theme park, which comes on top of a plan for stringent virus prevention measures in California attractions.

“We deeply appreciate Assembly Members Quirk-Silva and Valladares for their leadership and for introducing legislation on Safe Theme Park Reopening,” said Erin Guerrero, executive director of the California Attractions and Parks Association (CAPA).

“Worldwide, theme parks have proven they can reopen responsibly while protecting the health of guests and staff. Science and data show it can be done. California should allow theme parks to reopen responsibly in the Orange – Moderate – Tier 3.

“California’s iconic theme parks are important economic drivers for the state and local regions. AB 420 is needed so theme parks can plan to reopen responsibly and get back to contributing to the economic recovery of our state.”

Read a draft version of the bill here


 



© Kazoo 5 Limited 2021