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Museum plans included as Italy begins major redevelopment of one of Europe’s largest historic buildings | Planet Attractions
     

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Museum plans included as Italy begins major redevelopment of one of Europe’s largest historic buildings

The Albergo dei Poveri, one of Europe’s biggest historic buildings, is undergoing nearly €150m worth of work that will see it house the National Archaeological Museum of Naples, as well as university facilities and the city’s National Library




In 1752, Ferdinando Fuga began construction on the massive, seven-story Real Albergo dei Poveri   Credit: ABDR Architetti Associati

Italy has started work on what its government is describing as “the biggest cultural infrastructure in Europe”, with the nearly €150m project representing a major highlight of the city’s heritage offering.

Once a sprawling hospital complex, the newly renovated Albergo dei Poveri in Naples will be home to the National Archaeological Museum of Naples (MANN) when work is completed in 2026.

Originally built in 1752, The scale of the project was originally meant to emphasise the power of King Carlo III’s regime as well as suit its daily function - a complex to house the destitute and ill, as well as to provide a self-sufficient community where the poor could live, learn trades, and work. The massive hospice at one time housed over 5,000 people and is in the heart of Naples, which is included on the Unesco World Heritage List.

Since construction, the building suffered from earthquake damage in the 1980s and general neglect through the centuries, though the façade underwent a restoration in 2006. Its more than 100,000sq m (1.1 million sq ft) of floor space has made it of keen interest for use, also making it one of Europe’s largest historic buildings.

Following its restoration and redevelopment, 10,000sq m (107,000sq ft) of exhibition space will form the new museum, while around half of the site will become teaching spaces and student dormitories for Naples’s Federico II University, with a new National Library for the city also factored in.

The museum will offer visitors a look at life in the famous ancient city of Pompeii, which was destroyed in AD79 by a huge volcanic eruption. Exhibits will include artefacts from MANN’s collection, including statues, home furnishings, keys, and bags of silver and gold. The museum will also use AV projection to reconstruct the interiors of Roman villas, including the Temple of Isis and the House of the Citharist.

“The revitalisation and consequent enhancement of the Albergo dei Poveri has been one of the priorities for our administration since taking office in order to reopen this extraordinary structure to citizenship in synergy with the other institutions involved,” said Naples mayor Gaetano Manfredi, speaking last year.

“This will become a permanent factory of creativity, culture, training, social inclusion and innovation.”

In total the works so far have cost €147m (US$157.9m, £124.2m) with renovations expected to be completed by mid-2026.


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Museum plans included as Italy begins major redevelopment of one of Europe’s largest historic buildings | Planet Attractions
news

Museum plans included as Italy begins major redevelopment of one of Europe’s largest historic buildings

The Albergo dei Poveri, one of Europe’s biggest historic buildings, is undergoing nearly €150m worth of work that will see it house the National Archaeological Museum of Naples, as well as university facilities and the city’s National Library




In 1752, Ferdinando Fuga began construction on the massive, seven-story Real Albergo dei Poveri   Credit: ABDR Architetti Associati

Italy has started work on what its government is describing as “the biggest cultural infrastructure in Europe”, with the nearly €150m project representing a major highlight of the city’s heritage offering.

Once a sprawling hospital complex, the newly renovated Albergo dei Poveri in Naples will be home to the National Archaeological Museum of Naples (MANN) when work is completed in 2026.

Originally built in 1752, The scale of the project was originally meant to emphasise the power of King Carlo III’s regime as well as suit its daily function - a complex to house the destitute and ill, as well as to provide a self-sufficient community where the poor could live, learn trades, and work. The massive hospice at one time housed over 5,000 people and is in the heart of Naples, which is included on the Unesco World Heritage List.

Since construction, the building suffered from earthquake damage in the 1980s and general neglect through the centuries, though the façade underwent a restoration in 2006. Its more than 100,000sq m (1.1 million sq ft) of floor space has made it of keen interest for use, also making it one of Europe’s largest historic buildings.

Following its restoration and redevelopment, 10,000sq m (107,000sq ft) of exhibition space will form the new museum, while around half of the site will become teaching spaces and student dormitories for Naples’s Federico II University, with a new National Library for the city also factored in.

The museum will offer visitors a look at life in the famous ancient city of Pompeii, which was destroyed in AD79 by a huge volcanic eruption. Exhibits will include artefacts from MANN’s collection, including statues, home furnishings, keys, and bags of silver and gold. The museum will also use AV projection to reconstruct the interiors of Roman villas, including the Temple of Isis and the House of the Citharist.

“The revitalisation and consequent enhancement of the Albergo dei Poveri has been one of the priorities for our administration since taking office in order to reopen this extraordinary structure to citizenship in synergy with the other institutions involved,” said Naples mayor Gaetano Manfredi, speaking last year.

“This will become a permanent factory of creativity, culture, training, social inclusion and innovation.”

In total the works so far have cost €147m (US$157.9m, £124.2m) with renovations expected to be completed by mid-2026.


 



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