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National Football Museum and Royal Botanic Gardens get share of £553m in carbon reduction scheme | Planet Attractions
     

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National Football Museum and Royal Botanic Gardens get share of £553m in carbon reduction scheme

The British government is supporting a range of public sector organisations in reducing their dependency on carbon and improving energy efficiency




The National Football Museum will receive a share of £15m to install low carbon heating   Credit: National Football Museum

The National Football Museum in Manchester and Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in London, are among a number of public sector entities to receive a share of £553m (US$695.4m, €648.9m) for low carbon heating and energy efficiency initiatives.

The fund will help hundreds of museums and leisure centres, as well as hospitals, schools and libraries across the UK save an average of £650m (US$817m, €762.8m) of public organisation and taxpayer money per year on energy bills over the course of the next 15 years.

Part of the £2.5bn (US$3.1bn, €2.93bn) Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme, more than 160 public sector organisations will see clean, efficient heat pumps installed and energy efficiency upgrades such as insulation fitted. These upgraded heating systems, powered by cleaner, cheaper, renewable energy, will reduce the use of fossil fuels exposed to volatile global energy prices, support thousands of jobs, and also save taxpayers money as these measures will ensure public buildings are cheaper to heat.

The National Football Museum will receive part of a £15.5m (US$19.5m, €18.2m) fund awarded to the Greater Manchester Combined Authority. This will be used to install low carbon heating.

“Here in Greater Manchester, we know we need to be taking bold and meaningful steps at every level to become carbon neutral by 2038,” said Greater Manchester mayor, Andy Burnham.

“By moving towards a greener economy we can foster new skills and create thousands of good jobs, powering our recovery from the pandemic and charting a course to a more sustainable, low-carbon future.”

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, meanwhile, will invest more than £4.4m (US$ 5.5m, €5.2m) to decarbonise the Grade II listed Nash Conservatory and Jodrell Laboratory.

“The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew is committed to taking urgent steps to tackle climate change and achieve the goals set out in our Sustainability Strategy, including to become Climate Positive by 2030,” said Peter Alesbury, director of Estates at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

“This funding will help deliver significant carbon savings and take us a step closer to achieving this target.”

The Exmoor National Park Authority in the southwest of England will also receive £115,000 (US$144,000, €134,800) to install clean heating at Pinkery Outdoor Education Centre, which is off-grid and has no mains gas, electricity or water.

The wider scheme is driving efforts to reduce emissions from public sector buildings by 75%, compared to 2017 levels, by 2037.

“Using cleaner technology to heat our civic buildings is helping to shield public sector organisations from costly fossil fuels, especially at a time of high global prices,” said business and energy minister, Lord Callanan.

“This funding will bring significant savings for taxpayers of well over half a billion pounds each year by making public buildings cheaper to run, heat and cool, whilst supporting economic growth and jobs across the country.”

Guidance on how to apply for the next round of applications to the scheme, Phase 3b, will be published in July. The next round of applications is expected to open in September.


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National Football Museum and Royal Botanic Gardens get share of £553m in carbon reduction scheme | Planet Attractions

news

National Football Museum and Royal Botanic Gardens get share of £553m in carbon reduction scheme

The British government is supporting a range of public sector organisations in reducing their dependency on carbon and improving energy efficiency




The National Football Museum will receive a share of £15m to install low carbon heating   Credit: National Football Museum

The National Football Museum in Manchester and Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in London, are among a number of public sector entities to receive a share of £553m (US$695.4m, €648.9m) for low carbon heating and energy efficiency initiatives.

The fund will help hundreds of museums and leisure centres, as well as hospitals, schools and libraries across the UK save an average of £650m (US$817m, €762.8m) of public organisation and taxpayer money per year on energy bills over the course of the next 15 years.

Part of the £2.5bn (US$3.1bn, €2.93bn) Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme, more than 160 public sector organisations will see clean, efficient heat pumps installed and energy efficiency upgrades such as insulation fitted. These upgraded heating systems, powered by cleaner, cheaper, renewable energy, will reduce the use of fossil fuels exposed to volatile global energy prices, support thousands of jobs, and also save taxpayers money as these measures will ensure public buildings are cheaper to heat.

The National Football Museum will receive part of a £15.5m (US$19.5m, €18.2m) fund awarded to the Greater Manchester Combined Authority. This will be used to install low carbon heating.

“Here in Greater Manchester, we know we need to be taking bold and meaningful steps at every level to become carbon neutral by 2038,” said Greater Manchester mayor, Andy Burnham.

“By moving towards a greener economy we can foster new skills and create thousands of good jobs, powering our recovery from the pandemic and charting a course to a more sustainable, low-carbon future.”

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, meanwhile, will invest more than £4.4m (US$ 5.5m, €5.2m) to decarbonise the Grade II listed Nash Conservatory and Jodrell Laboratory.

“The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew is committed to taking urgent steps to tackle climate change and achieve the goals set out in our Sustainability Strategy, including to become Climate Positive by 2030,” said Peter Alesbury, director of Estates at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

“This funding will help deliver significant carbon savings and take us a step closer to achieving this target.”

The Exmoor National Park Authority in the southwest of England will also receive £115,000 (US$144,000, €134,800) to install clean heating at Pinkery Outdoor Education Centre, which is off-grid and has no mains gas, electricity or water.

The wider scheme is driving efforts to reduce emissions from public sector buildings by 75%, compared to 2017 levels, by 2037.

“Using cleaner technology to heat our civic buildings is helping to shield public sector organisations from costly fossil fuels, especially at a time of high global prices,” said business and energy minister, Lord Callanan.

“This funding will bring significant savings for taxpayers of well over half a billion pounds each year by making public buildings cheaper to run, heat and cool, whilst supporting economic growth and jobs across the country.”

Guidance on how to apply for the next round of applications to the scheme, Phase 3b, will be published in July. The next round of applications is expected to open in September.


 



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